Production company seeks extras for documentary filming in Edmonton area on Sunday

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Ever wanted to be in a movie? Here’s your chance.

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An Alberta production company is seeking volunteers to play extras in an upcoming documentary.

“Fallen Heroes: Their Journey Home” is about the repatriation of Canadian soldiers who lost their lives during the Afghanistan war.

Multiple scenes that recreate the Highway of Heroes — a stretch of Highway 401 between CFB Trenton and Toronto where soldiers’ remains are transported in funeral convoys — will be filmed on Sunday in Sturgeon County.

Those interested are asked to meet at Namao school on Sunday starting at 7 a.m., however the producers say people can drop in at any time and they will be transported to where they need to be for filming. Combined Forces Production Collaborative will continue to film for the documentary on Monday and Tuesday.

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The Highway of Heroes scenes were originally going to be filmed in Ontario, but COVID-19 derailed the initial plans and the City of Edmonton stepped up.

“We’re creating the 401 in Sturgeon County,” said Karen Storwick, one of the film’s producers, in an interview. “The volunteers will be the people that line the sides of the roadway, the highway, in Ontario as motorcades were going by without fail. That was a very, very touching and cathartic experience for the families to be supported by Canadians like that on a grassroots level.”

Storwick said they will take all the volunteers interested and people can contact their location manager at keeley.net@gmail.com for a form in advance, but she said those interested can also drop in and fill out a form in person on Sunday.

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“Fallen Heroes: Their Journey Home” will premiere in Edmonton on April 17, 2022 at the Metro Cinema. The film’s director and producer, Robert Curtin, said other cities such as Toronto, Montreal and Winnipeg have reached out to host their own premieres.

“We aren’t trying to make a blockbuster movie. We’re not trying to compete with Hollywood,” said Curtin. “What we wanted to do was create a movie we could share with Canadians and help Canadians understand and re-live that period in our country.”

Curtin said the documentary is just as much about Canadians as a whole as it is about the fallen heroes and their return. He adds it’s about the response from Canadians to that sacrifice made and the entire movie is like holding a mirror up to Canada.

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Storwick and Curtin said it’s important to have as many extras as possible because they have made an effort to run the production of the film as accurate to the real story as possible.

The goal isn’t just to produce a documentary. Storwick said they are creating an age-appropriate version of the film with some e-software that will help kids understand the war and why it was important Canadians were supporting soldiers at the time.

“We look forward to being able to distribute this throughout the schools in not just Alberta, but across Canada,” she said.

ktaniguchi@postmedia.com

twitter.com/kellentaniguchi

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